About the Competition
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The Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2006 was judged in two stages. In November of 2005 a panel of experts used an online jurying system to select approximately 100 semifinalist works. The Gallery arranged to ship these paintings and sculptures to Washington, D.C., where the panel met again in early March of 2006 to select the 51 finalists. These works are installed in the National Portrait Gallery’s newly renovated second-floor special exhibition galleries.

The jurors will include:

Carolyn K. Carr
Carolyn K. Carr
Deputy Director and Chief Curator, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Carolyn Kinder Carr received her B.A from Smith College, her M.A. from Oberlin College, and her Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University. From 1978 to 1983 she was chief curator at the Akron Art Museum in Ohio. She has also taught art history at Kent State University and the University of Akron. Carr has curated many exhibitions on modern and contemporary art and portraiture.  She is the author of Alice Neel’s Women (2002) and Hans Namuth: Portraits (1998), and the coauthor, with Dr. Ellen Miles, of A Brush with History: Paintings from the National Portrait Gallery. She most recently co-curated “Retratos: 2,000 Years of Latin American Portraits.”

Trevor Fairbrother
Trevor Fairbrother
Independent Scholar and Curator, Boston, Mass.

Trevor Fairbrother earned both his B.A. and his M.A. from Oxford University. He completed training at Sotheby’s London and then earned his Ph.D. from Boston University. From 1996 to 2001 he was the Seattle Art Museum´s deputy director of art and curator of modern art. He also served as curator of contemporary art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. A noted Sargent scholar, he is the author of John Singer Sargent: The Sensualist (2001), which accompanied an exhibition on Sargent. His interview with Andy Warhol appeared in Arts Magazine in 1987, and he organized the exhibition Beuys and Warhol: The Artist as Shaman and Star for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 1991. His recent projects as an independent curator and scholar include the exhibition and book Family Ties: A Contemporary Perspective (2003) and an essay in Art in America on new photographic portraits by Gary Schneider.

Brandon Fortune
Brandon Fortune
Associate Curator of Painting and Sculpture, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Brandon Brame Fortune graduated from Agnes Scott College and received an M.A. and Ph.D. in art history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Since 2000, she has served in her current position, having worked within the Department of Painting and Sculpture since joining the Gallery’s staff in 1987. Her primary research areas have been 18th- and 19th-century American portraiture, including the work of Charles Willson Peale, and women portraitists of the late 19th century. In 1999 she was co-curator of the exhibition Franklin & His Friends: Portraying the Man of Science in Eighteenth-Century America and author of the accompanying publication. For the last three years she has been researching contemporary portraiture and is the Gallery’s coordinator for the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2006.

Thelma Golden
Thelma Golden
Director, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, N.Y.

Thelma Golden was educated in art history and African American studies at Smith College. Prior to her appointment at the Studio Museum, she was a curator at the Whitney Museum of Art and for Peter and Eileen Norton of Los Angeles. In addition to her curatorial work, Golden teaches, lectures, and writes about contemporary art, cultural issues, and curatorial practice all over the world. She was a visiting professor at the School of the Arts at Columbia University and has been a lecturer at both Yale and Cornell University. She is a member of the Graduate Committee of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. Since taking over the position at the Studio Museum in January 2000, she has organized a number of exhibitions, including Isaac Julien: Vagabondia”; “Martin Puryear: The Cane Project”; “Glenn Ligon: Stranger”; “Material and Matter”; “Freestyle"; "Yinka Shonibare”; “Red, Black and Green”; and “Black Romantic.”

Sidney Goodman Sidney Goodman
Artist, Philadelphia, Pa.

Sidney Goodman has been painting figuratively for more than forty years. His home is in Philadelphia, where he studied at the Philadelphia College of Art and teaches at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. His work has been the subject of major museum shows, including a 1996 exhibition, Sidney Goodman: Paintings and Drawings,” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and has been exhibited widely throughout the United States. In New York, he has had twenty-five solo shows at the Terry Dintenfass Gallery, and has shown more recently at Salander-
O’ Reilly Gallery and at ACA Gallery. Among the museums that have collected his work are the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and the National Portrait Gallery.


Marc Pachter
Marc Pachter
Director, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Marc Pachter graduated summa cum laude from the University of California at Berkeley and did doctoral work in American history at Harvard University. For much of his career at the Smithsonian he served as chief historian of the National Portrait Gallery, and then in central administration, dealing with international relations, among other concerns. He was chair of the delegation of American cultural critics to the Soviet Union in 1989. From 1985 to 1990, he was senior cultural adviser to the United States Information Agency. An author and editor with a particular interest in cultural history and biography, he has conducted public interviews for the Smithsonian with such notable figures as William L. Shirer, Umberto Eco, and Katharine Graham. Pachter presided over the jury that selected the winners of the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2006.

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Katy Siegel
Associate Professor of Art History and Criticism, Hunter College, CUNY, and Contributing Editor, Artforum

Katy Siegel received her undergraduate degree from Oberlin College and earned both her M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin. Her wide repertoire of publications will soon include the release (in 2006) of her latest work, Abstract Expressionism. Her publications also include Sidney Tillim: Art After Ideology and Art Works: Money (co-authored with Paul Mattick). Siegel has written many essays about modern and contemporary art, most recently on Takashi Murakami, for his exhibition Little Boy at the Japan Society; Richard Tuttle, for his retrospective at SFMoMA; and Remote Viewing at the Whitney Museum of Art.



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